How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron

How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron

Because your blood pressure monitor works automatically, it will need to be re-calibrated at least once every two years to be sure it is giving you accurate results. To have your automatic home monitor re-calibrated, you will need to send it back to the manufacturer. About know you how to calibrate blood pressure monitor Omron.

How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron

To  get  blood pressure  readings,  this  device  should  be calibrated  by  a you or your doctor  with  a  traditional  arm or wrist cuff  blood  pressure  meter (not included).  Blood pressure (BP) varies by individual so  each  User  must  complete  his/her  own  calibration before  using the Performance Monitor <Body  Check> function to measure  or  track your blood  pressure.  The calibration should be performed when the user is calmly sitting down.

How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron

Monitoring the blood pressure of a hypertension patient is one of the most effective ways to treat hypertension. Digital blood pressure monitors are an invention that helps to aid the monitoring of blood pressure for hypertension patients. However, after comparing the accuracy of the measurements with the sphygmomanometer, the digital blood pressure monitor offers convenience benefits but sacrifices the accuracy of the measurements (de Greeff, et al, 2008).

2 These variations were also observed in several literature reviews on clinical practice setting, which is very detrimental for hypertension treatment processes (Mattu, et al, 2004, Belghazi, et al, 2007, and Chen, et al, 2008).

The traditional method to measure blood pressure is done using a mercury sphygmomanometer. This device gives a very accurate reading of an individual’s blood pressure but it requires training and certain skill set. It is also hard to determine the blood pressure since it is done through listening. Thus it is not very convenient for the patient to do the blood pressure checking alone.

This device can also bring a “white coat” effect as most cardiologists refer to, which is an effect that raises patient’s blood pressure because of seeing or being in an environment where clinical equipment is used or white coat doctors are present (it can be stressful). This effect can raise blood pressure for hypertension patient up to 15% to 30% (Picker, et al, 1988).

Thus, a user-friendly device for the patient is necessary yet it has to have the capability to obtain accurate blood pressure measurements. This is especially important in present-day because there are approximately 32% of 20+ yr old adults that are diagnosed with hypertension yet are non-institutionalized (Health, United States, 2009).

Blood Pressure Monitor Omron

Currently, devices used out in the field (and not in a medical office) are digital blood pressure monitors, such as Omron. More read How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron.

However, these digital monitors don’t have a method to re-calibrate the device resulting in it being necessary to replace the devices pretty regularly in order to get an accurate reading of the blood pressure for the hypertension patients. This is an obvious problem considering how it is very inefficient and not very realistic for poorer countries who cannot afford this luxury.

In this project, we verified the common hypothesis that digital blood pressure monitor readings vary significantly with the sphygmomanometer in a controlled clinical experiment setting. We also investigated the causes of variation and proposed a possible circuit diagram that can solve this impeding issue on our national healthcare.

3 Method This project is aimed to verify the variation of blood pressure measurements between an automatic blood pressure monitor and a sphygmomanometer as well as to investigate the causes of these variations.

The variations of blood pressure measurements are commonly observed phenomena in clinical hypertension treatment across the nation (Mattu, et al, 2004, Belghazi, et al, 2007, and Chen, et al, 2008).

Since most of these variations were clinical experiences rather than controlled studies under controlled clinical experimental settings, the blood pressure measurements between a commonly used automatic blood pressure monitor and a clinical commonly used sphygmomanometer had to be compared in a controlled experiment.

Experiment 1: The automatic blood pressure monitor that was used in this project is Omron arm cuff blood pressure monitor, 5 series, model BP742. This blood monitor was chosen for this project because the Omron brand is commonly used in hypertension treatment and blood pressure monitor regulation processes in out-of-clinic settings base on Amazon.com (such as in the field with Doctors Without Borders).

The sphygmomanometer was used as the gold standard because this is the method that is used by almost all of the clinics across the nation (Mattu, et al, 2004, Belghazi, et al, 2007, and Chen, et al, 2008). In order to test the variation that was observed in most of the clinics (Mattu, et al, 2004, Belghazi, et al, 2007, and Chen, et al, 2008), the following experiment was conducted on one of the team members for this project. More Read How to Calibrate Blood Pressure Monitor Omron.

Blood pressure of the team member was taken three times a day throughout a five day period. The blood pressure was measured first by Omron arm cuff blood pressure monitor, model BP742, then the blood pressure was measured again immediately afterwards with the clinically viewed gold standard, mercury sphygmomanometer.

These data values were obtained and recorded for a 4 Figure 1: The CuffLink Non-invasive Blood Pressure Stimulator used in this experiment. five day period for this experiment. Next an equal variance, two tail t-test was used to analyze these data which is shown in the result section of this report.

Experiment 2: To eliminate the human error factor as much as possible, this experiment was also conducted in the following setup. The CuffLink Non-invasive Blood Pressure Stimulator from the Clinical Engineering Department from Vanderbilt Medical Center was used to produce a controlled blood pressure, which acts as an artificial arm.

Two blood pressure settings were tested: normal blood pressure condition and hypertension blood pressure condition. The normal blood pressure condition was set at 120/80 mmHg and the hypertension blood pressure condition was set at 150/100 mmHg. 20 measurements were taken for both conditions.

Each condition was measured by both Omron arm cuff blood pressure monitor and mercury sphygmomanometer, and equal variance, a two-tailed t-test was performed at the end of this data collection. Figure 1 shows the CuffLink Noninvasive Blood Pressure Stimulator that was used in this experiment.

Experiment 3: In order to investigate the causes of the blood pressure measurements variation between the Omron blood pressure monitor and mercury sphygmomanometer, the following experiment was conducted to verify the hypothesis that the air retained in the arm cuff 5 Figure 2: The experiment set up for experiment 3 for Omron measurements.

The Omron device used is model BP 742. causes the variation. The hypothesis was formed for several reasons. First, for the mercury sphygmomanometer, the arm cuff releases its entire arm cuff air completely after each user due to the screw of the air bulb for pumping the air.

However for the automatic blood pressure monitor that was studied in this project (Omron, BP 742), only an air tube was put in place for this purpose. The whole air tube was inside the device which is also embedded along with the pressure sensor and other important electronic components.

This could cause possible air pressure detection issues for the device, since the device uses mostly pressure resistor sensor (US2007/00381278A1). Second, the mercury sphygmomanometer was mostly used by trained nurses and physical assistance in a clinical setting who has trained properly for the usage of this device.

Thus, on a profession stand point of view, they should aware the arm cuff deflation completion before each usage of the device. The automatic blood pressure monitor was used mostly in the home setting for the patient, thus there is a great increase of human error.

Based on the reasons above, the hypothesis that the arm cuff has not reached a complete deflation or that there is some air present in the automatic blood pressure monitor could cause the variations that were observed in clinical 6 Figure 3: The experiment set up for experiment 3 for Mercury Sphygmomanometer measurements. practice and in this project.

The following experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis. The CuffLink Non-invasive blood pressure analyzer was used in this experiment. The pressure was set at 120/80 mmHg.

25 measurements were taken in this experiment for each device: Omron automatic blood pressure monitor and mercury sphygmomanometer. A two-tailed, student t-test for equal variance data was conducted at the end of the data collection to test the hypothesis.

Figure 2 shows the experimental setup for experiment 3 for the Omron automatic blood pressure monitor. The CuffLink Non-invasive blood pressure analyzer was the device that Omron was attached to in Figure 2. Figure 3 shows the experimental setup for experiment 3 for the mercury sphygmomanometer.

The CuffLink Non-invasive blood pressure analyzer was the device used and the pressure that was recorded in this experiment was the arm cuff pressure as shown in Figure 3. In this experiment, right after each measurement that was taken by Omron, the arm cuff is pressed to ensure there is no air left and ensures 100% deflation of the arm cuff before the next measurements.

This process was used as a step to eliminate the air retention in the blood pressure monitor and to test the hypothesis that the variation is caused by the air retention in the arm cuff or the device.

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