Infrared-Laser-Thermometer

Infrared Laser Thermometer Review: Better for Your

Get next-generation technology today with the ultimate Professional-Grade Infrared Laser Thermometer. It offers a state-of-the-art 8-point circular laser that defines your target area under test. This thermometer has a full-color LCD display/back-light and 0.1 resolutions.

Features of Infrared Laser Thermometers

1. Temperature Range: -76° F to 932° F or -60° C to 500° C

2. Distance to Spot Size Ratio: 12:1

3. Accuracy: +/- 2% of reading with 1/10 degree resolution

4. Emissivity Preset: 0.95

5. Optic Ratio: 9:1

6. Measures: Average and Maximum temperatures

7. Response Time: 1 sec.

8. Power Supply: [2] AAA batteries (included)

9. Model #: TN418L1

10. Dimensions: 1.5″ x 6″ x 7.5″

11. Weight: 9 oz

12. Amber back-light LCD display

13. Auto-off

14. Select Celsius or Fahrenheit

15. Low battery icon

Sight technologies enable the precise application of infrared temperature measurement devices.

Simple, cost-effective handheld laser thermometers utilize a single-point laser pointer so as to point the middle of the measuring spot with a particular amount of parallax error.

Here it is left to the user to estimate the size of the measuring spot by means of the measuring spot diagram and the distance.

If the measurement object only captures a part of the measuring spot, the measured temperature will be represented as the mean value between the hot and cold surface areas of the measuring spot.

With small measurement objects, in particular, this can lead to the distortion of the measurement result, meaning potentially critical situations are not recognized.

In order to properly display the measuring spot in its full size, laser thermometers with optical sights were developed which use crosshairs to mark the dimensions, thus allowing precise targeting.

1. Laser thermometer with dual laser

In a dual laser system, two laser beams being emitted from the lens approximately depict the narrowing or widening of the measuring beam from larger distances.

The diameter of the measuring spot is indicated by means of the distance between the two laser points on its circumference.

The simultaneous usage of the video module and a crosshair marking allows video pyrometers to exactly mark the measurement field.

2. Laser thermometer with crosshair sight

Thanks to the utilization of the latest laser illumination technologies, it’s possible to represent the measuring spots of infrared thermometers.

As an accurately sized crosshair whose dimensions precisely match those of the measuring spot.

Here, four laser diodes which are symmetrically arranged around the infrared optical measuring channel are equipped with line generators.

Which generate a line of a specific length at the focusing distance determined by the lens.

Opposing pairs of projected laser lines fully overlap at the focus point in such a way that they form a measuring cross or crosshairs which precisely depict the measuring spot.

For shorter or longer measurement distances, the overlapping is only partial, meaning that the length of the line and, as a result, the size of the measuring cross will change for the user.

Thanks to this technology the precise dimensions of the measuring spot are often clearly measured employing a laser thermometer.

This means a considerable improvement in the practical applicability of devices with good optical performance.

3. Laser thermometer with focus point switching

In the areas of electronic maintenance and industrial quality control, in particular, small measurement objects often need to be measured at short distances (0.75 – 2.5 m).

Here, the development of new measurement devices allows the measuring spot to be focused within certain limits.

In the process, the respective laser thermometers employ a technology during which a twin-lens optical system are often switched to live very small measuring spots by mechanically adjusting the inner lens position almost like macro mode in digital cameras.

However, this is restricted to a fixed distance. If you move closer to or further away from the measurement object, the measuring spot rapidly increases in size.

With the help of two overlapping laser beams that display a laser point diameter of exactly 1 millimeter at the position of the littlest measuring spot.

It’s possible to set both the optimum distance and therefore the optimum measuring spot size.

However, setting measuring spot sizes of less than one millimeter remains a technical challenge even for laser thermometers with focus point switching.

The following illustration shows the optical system of a contemporary infrared thermometer during which the lens position is adjustable and various laser illumination systems can simultaneously be used for an actual-size display of the measuring spot.

4. Measure the Surface Temperature of Solid Objects!

Infrared thermometers allow you to measure the temperature of solid surfaces, even a very hot one, without touching it (or changing its temperature)!

Just point and press the button for an accurate reading. The Laser Infrared Thermometer features a D:S ratio of 12, has compact styling, laser aiming, large backlit display, and tons more.

It is ideal for users that need a range of a whopping 48 inches or less. Temperature range is -76° to 932°F or -60° to 500°C. Emissivity is preset at .95.

Probably the nicest feature of this unit is that the always-on MAX mode. This shows you the utmost reading and therefore the actual reading while you scan the enclosure.

Supplying you with the basking and background temps all at an equivalent time.

179 grams with batteries. Uses 2-AAA batteries (included).

5. Elcometer 214L IR Digital Laser Thermometer

The Elcometer 214 may be a simple, easy-to-use, non-contact thermometer that safely and accurately measures the surface temperature of non-reflective materials using infrared technology.

With a user switchable measuring range of -35°C to 365°C or -31°F to 689°F, an alphanumeric display of the temperature is produced in but one second.

6. Non-contact technology with laser spot indicator

1. ºC / ºF user switchable

2. Fast, 1-second scanning of any surface

3. Measure objects as small as 25mm (1”)

4. Distance-to-Target Ratio of 8:1

5. Easy to read LCD display

The Elcometer 214 IR Digital Laser Thermometer features a D/T ratio (Distance-to-Target) of 8:1 and measures the emitted energy from a target spot one-eighth the dimensions of the working distance.

As are often seen within the diagram, if the space from the sensor optics to the target is 200mm (8″) for instance, the diameter of the measured area is 25mm (1″).

7. Maverick LT-04 Infrared Laser Thermometer

The Maverick LT-04 Infrared Thermometer replaces the LT-03 in their IR lineup. Like most other units of this type, it has a laser to assist in pointing the device at the target.

The display indicates the measured temperature, the min/max temperatures, scale in use (ºF or ºC), battery condition, and laser status (on or off).

The illustration on the instruction sheet also shows a USB and a “cue aware” (their typo).

However, there is no mention of any alarm feature in the text instructions and there is no USB port on the unit. Dubious documentation, I suppose?

The emissivity setting of 0.95 is also shown, and the emissivity not adjustable by the user.

It is difficult to assess the accuracy of IR guns without fancy equipment, so I had to improvise. I pointed the device at a dish of ice water.

A pot of simmering water that measured 205ºF with a conventional thermometer of known accuracy, and the surface of some cooking oil heated to approximately 345ºF.

I also pointed to a pan of cooking oil that was at 86ºF. The measurements are summarized below:

Actual: IR Reading

32º: 30º

86º: 86º

205º: 190º

345º: 356º

The temperature reading of an infrared thermometer assumes that the emissivity is set correctly for the surface being measured. Most IR thermometers are set for a typical emissivity of 0.95.

That is the setting Maverick uses, but it’s not adjustable. This might be a problem for accurate measurement of a surface with a significantly different emissivity, such as a shiny surface.

The behavior and accuracy seem typical of IR guns I’ve tested. The display is easy to read and the backlight makes it easy to use in dim light.

You can control the backlight, the laser, and the temperature scale using buttons on the rear of the unit.

Another button toggles between the maximum and minimum reading during the most recent measurement cycle.

The instruction sheet is minimal with a few spelling errors, but it is adequate to use the unit effectively.

The manufacturer’s contact info is listed in case technical support is required. The warranty runs for 90 days.

The build quality is good and the basic features are there for a very reasonable price. It earns a solid Silver Medal.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q. What is an infrared laser thermometer used to measure?

Ans: They are sometimes called laser thermometers as a laser is employed to assist aim the thermometer.

Non-contact thermometers or temperature guns, to explain the device’s ability to live temperature from a distance.

Q. Can you use an infrared laser thermometer on humans?

Ans: Yes, you can use a general-purpose medical infrared thermometer to measure human-forehead temperature.

Q. What is an infrared thermometer best used for?

Ans: Infrared (IR) thermometers enable you to live temperature quickly, at a distance, and without touching the thing you’re measuring.

They are so useful, easy, and even fun to use that they need to become as common in kitchens as they need on factory floors.

Q. Are forehead thermometers accurate?

Ans: Rectal temps are the most accurate. Forehead temps are the next most accurate.

Oral and ear temps also are accurate if done properly. Temps done in the armpit are the least accurate.

Conclusion

Ever wonder what infrared laser thermometers are?

I finally did a little research and discovered that these devices measure the amount of heat (or infrared energy) emitted by an object.

The laser component is merely for aiming, sending out a skinny red beam of sunshine so you recognize where you’re pointing it.

I also found that these thermometers only measure surface temperature.

In order that they can’t assist you to gauge the doneness of a roast or the other food where you would like internal temperature.

Bonjour, the most manufacturers of infrared thermometers for home use, says they’re intended to live refrigerator, oven, or pan surface temperatures.

I was hoping to also use it to check the temperature of liquids like deep-frying oil or sugar syrup, but the measurements were too inconsistent.

It did, however, work very well for tempering melted chocolate, and if you’re fussy about getting your butter softened to a precise 65°F before baking, this thermometer can help.

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